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When Pearce was three years old, his father took the job of Chief Test pilot for the Australian Government Aircraft Factories, relocating the family to Geelong, Victoria, Australia, where his mother taught at Matthew Flinders Girls High school.

When Pearce was aged 8, his father died in a accident at Avalon Airport while taking-off in an extended-range version of the GAF Nomad.

But the movie surrounds these two with Nicole Kidman as Saroo’s adoptive mother, Rooney Mara as his Indian food-loving girlfriend, and Priyanka Bose as the mum he left behind (her smile so lovely she could pass for Rosario Dawson’s South Asian sister). Davis, a commercials director whose reel includes Toyota’s “Ninja Kittens” spot, would be a natural to boil Saroo’s story down to a tear-jerking 60 seconds (even if this material sounds like an extended promo for the one company that needs it least).

In 2013, Davis collaborated with Jane Campion on the miniseries “Top of the Lake,” which suggests that he could probably also stretch Saroo’s narrative across four more hours.

Feel-good films stretch back right into the early days of cinema. Producer Cecil Hepworth's Rescued By Rover (1905), a winsome yarn about a dog retrieving a kidnapped baby, was an early example of feel-good film-making.

What distinguished it wasn't just the anthropomorphy or the presence of fat-cheeked little infant but the tempo.

During her modelling days, Bollywood’s leggy lass dated model and actor, Nihaar Pandya, for quite some time.

The two met at an acting school in Mumbai for the first time.

In the wake of the financial crisis and only weeks after the massacre at the Mumbai hotels, it's a film to enliven and excite audiences craving escape from grim headlines.But let’s get serious: The story of how 5-year-old Saroo was tragically separated from his family, wound up adopted by an Aussie couple on a completely different continent, and managed to find his birth mother 25 years later using Google Earth might be a happy one, but it’s barely meaty enough to wrap the evening news, let alone sustain a two-hour feature.While unique, Saroo’s story is somewhere between the-guy-who-found-a-lottery-scratcher-worth-fifty-bucks and the-farmer-who-prayed-for-rain-and-got-it.In telling the story of how a Mumbai street-kid ends up competing for the top prize on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?Boyle touches on such subjects as homelessness, child exploitation, poverty and police brutality.